Lake Trout Research in Wisconsin

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Lake Trout Research in Wisconsin

Postby scott_bentley » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:07 pm

Lake Trout Research in Wisconsin

Thomas W Wrasse, Conservation Warden Supervisor, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
http://dnr.wi.gov/

About 10,000 years ago as the glaciers moved their way through Canada and into northern Wisconsin they carved out and created “dams” on literally 1000’s of lakes across the landscape. Then during the period of glacier recession much of this area flooded allowing for free movement of fish throughout. The southern tip of the glaciers ended in northern Wisconsin sparing many of the existing lakes from the flooding isolating the fish that currently resided there. Modern day research done on lake trout in the drainage basin that encompasses parts of Canada and Wisconsin revealed three distinct genetic strains of fish. Over forty inland lakes were tested along with Lake Superior. In all but two lakes, located in Wisconsin, multiple strains of lake trout were identified. The two in Wisconsin revealed only one genetic strain. Wisconsin is preserving the life of the unique strain by tightly regulating harvest and using modern day science to propagate the species.

In this case overview a ROV equipped with multi-beam sonar, color camera and lights was used to monitor the fyke nets used to capture the fish, check on the health of the fish in the nets’ pot and to verify the existence of free swimming fish along the spawning grounds.
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Bio and Image

Postby scott_bentley » Mon Dec 20, 2010 5:01 pm

Water got into Tom’s veins at a very early age as he grew up south of Oshkosh, Wisconsin on the shores of Lake Winnebago, one of the nations largest inland lakes. It was the daily experiences associated with outdoor activities that inspired him to pursue a career that was aimed at protecting those same resources. Tom began his law enforcement career with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) as a conservation warden in 1984. In 1988 he was promoted to warden supervisor and stationed in the relatively dry southwest portion of Wisconsin. In 1991 Tom was able to transfer to the water rich warden supervisor position in northern Wisconsin and holds that position yet today. Tom supervises nine permanent conservation wardens across a region of four counties that encompasses over 2700 lakes.

Since obtaining their first VideoRay, a PRO 3 GTO, in 2006 the WDNR Conservation Wardens are finding themselves diving into a niche of specialized underwater investigation. Tom leads the team of operators for the WDNR and is very excited about the role they are taking on with other agencies across the state. To date the WDNR owns three VideoRay’s, the PRO 3 and two PRO 4’s.

trwasse2.jpg
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